Five Questions for Artist Elizabeth St. Hilaire

Elizabeth St. Hilaire joins us for another paper collage workshop in 2018 and we couldn’t be more excited to have her back! This year’s workshop, from June 24-30, 2018, will focus specifically on crafting animal portraits. In advance of her workshop, Elizabeth took a moment to answer a few questions for us!

Q: What was your path to becoming a full-time working artist?
ESH: I have a BFA from Syracuse University, I have always been a full-time working artist, starting off in Graphic Design and ultimately making the transition to full time painter and workshop instructor.

Q: Do you work on multiple pieces concurrently or focus on exclusively one at a time? If the former, how do you balance that? If the later, how do you decide which one to start next?
ESH: I have two easels in my studio and i work on multiple pieces at a time depending on my deadlines. I often paint in a series, so that determining “what’s next” is a little easier. I have one easel that holds larger, oversized work, and one that is set up for smaller work.

Q: How do you come up with ideas to begin something new?
ESH: I have a variety of successful subject matter that I rotate in and out of according to what’s of interest to me at that time.

Q: What keeps you motivated to continue making art?
ESH: It’s how I pay my bills 🙂 And it’s my true love, my happy place, my comfort, my joy, myself.

Q: What’s the biggest “risk” you’ve taken in your journey as an artist? Creatively, in a business sense, or in life?
ESH: Deciding to give up the commercial life of graphic design in order to be a full-time fine artist.

Learn more about Elizabeth’s Paper Collage workshop here.
Find out more about Laurie on her website and give her a follow on Facebook, Pinterest, & YouTube.

 

Five Questions for Artist Joel Popadics

Just as the northern Catskills are at their greenest, join us and watercolorist Joel Popadics from June 17-23, 2018 to work on those green tones! In advance of his workshop, Joel took a moment to answer our short interview to help us learn a bit more about his background and approach to art.

Q: When did art first enter your life?
JP: As a toddler, I remember watching my mother draw along with Jon Gnagy while watching his television show “You are an Artist.” Years later, I drew all the pictures from his drawing kit. Art and creating has always been part of my life. As a child we attended a church that was elaborately decorated in paintings depicting biblical scenes. To this day, I vividly recall those images and how profoundly they inspired me to become an artist.

Q: Do you have certain themes in your work or subjects that reappear? 
JP: Yes, a major theme in my work is light and mood of weather. I’m especially fond of the fog. The subject is well suited for watercolor and creates an instant mood in a picture. 

Q: If you could give only one piece of advice to a beginning artist, what would it be?
JP: If a beginning artist wants to become a painter, then I would suggest that they draw constantly and work on their craft.

Q: What drives you to produce new art?
JP: It’s what I do and how I make a living so there’s always a drive in my to produce. I love to learn and really enjoy the process of painting.

Q: What show, project, or event are you most looking forward to in 2018?
JP: I’m honored to be giving a watercolor demonstration for the American Watercolor Society on Wednesday, April 18, 2018 at the Salmagundi Club in NYC. It’s usually a “standing room only” crowd and the venue with its history gets me all excited for this event.

Learn more about Joel’s Capturing the Feeling of Light, Air, & Atmosphere in Your Watercolor Landscapes workshop here.
Find out more about Joel on his website and give him a follow on Facebook and Twitter.

Five Questions for Watercolorist Laurie Goldstein-Warren

We couldn’t be more excited to be bringing a watercolor portraiture workshop to our 2018 season with artist Laurie Goldstein-Warren. In advance of her workshop, Laurie took a moment to fill us in a bit more on her background and approach to art.

Q: What was your path to becoming a full-time working artist?
LGW: I began drawing with my brother when I was young, took art in high school. I was also a ballet dance with the Rochester Academy of Performing Arts. I had to quit dance when I was 19 due to knee problems. I returned to art when I moved to West Virginia in 1998. We live out in the country and I felt that now I had the time to reinvest in my art. I never looked back.

Q: Do you work on multiple pieces concurrently or focus on exclusively one at a time? If the former, how do you balance that? If the later, how do you decide which one to start next?
LGW: I usually focus on one painting at a time. Occasionally, I do work on workshop demo pieces along with my current work. If I am working on two or more at one time, I focus on the one in front of me at the moment, but sometimes, I may get an idea from one painting to incorporate into the other. 

Q: How do you come up with ideas to begin something new?
LGW: I have many photos from trips, etc. But for my portraiture, I also have some ready models, who are most gracious with their time when I need an inspiration.

Q: What keeps you motivated to continue making art?
LGW: Painting is like breathing to me. I do not like to go a day without some painting time. My motivation is to continue learning and bringing what I learn to my workshop students.

Q: What’s the biggest “risk” you’ve taken in your journey as an artist? Creatively, in a business sense, or in life?
LGW: I think the one time I was most nervous was right before my first workshop that I taught. I remember thinking what could I possibly show these artists? After the first day of that workshop, I was hooked! I love to teach and my students have been very happy with my teaching style.

 
Learn more about Laurie’s Limited Palettes Portrait workshop here.
Find out more about Laurie on her website and give her a follow on Facebook and Instagram.

Workshop Report: Paper Collage with Fran Skiles

We’ve officially finished off our painting workshop for the seasons and we couldn’t have ended it with a more exciting workshop! Fran Skiles and seventeen students spent the week crafting mixed media paper collage pieces including all sorts of varieties of paper, fiber, paint, thread, and more.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

And of course, our video for the week, found on our YouTube channel!

Five Questions for Artist Larisa Aukon

This week we’re highlighting another of our three-day workshops during 2018, this time with painter Larisa Aukon. Larisa’s workshop on the Power of Landscape will run from May 30-June 3, 2018.

Learn more about Larisa and her approach to art through our short five question interview with her.

Q: When did art first enter your life?
LA: I’ve had art around me as long as I can remember.

Q: Do you have certain themes in your work or subjects that reappear?
LA: Flowers is one of the subjects that come and go and then come back again.

Q: If you could give only one piece of advice to a beginning artist, what would it be?
LA: Beginners often are too hard on themselves and do not have enough patience. My advice would be to paint as often as you can and be more patient with themselves.

Q: What drives you to produce new art?
LA: Inspiration. New ideas. But there is also an element of studio routine and discipline, I just have to be in the studio every day and work.

Q: What show, project, or event are you most looking forward to in 2018?
LA: My annual solo show in Scottsdale, in Paul Scott Gallery is in January 2018 and I am looking forward to showing all my new work together. Teaching the workshop in the Hudson Valley is an event I am looking forward to and also I was invited to teach a plein air painting workshop at La Romita School of Art in Umbria, Italy – I am very excited to teach there and looking forward to this workshop too!

Learn more about Larisa’s Power of Landscape Workshop with us here.
Find out more about Paula on her website and give her a follow over on Facebook, Instagram, Pinterest, & Twitter.

Five Questions for Artist Christine Ivers

We’re thrilled to be offering a unique three-day workshop; from May 16-20, 2018, for pastelists this year with artist Christine Ivers. Join her and us to work on nightscapes with pastels.

Want to know a little more about Christine and her approach to art? Read on down for her responses to our five question interview series!

Q: What was your path to becoming a full-time working artist?
CI: I owned and operated a full service ad agency for many years and when everything crashed in 2008, I lost the business. The only thing I knew how to do was draw. I cleared my office and made a studio and put a sign out in front to teach art lessons. It all expanded from there. 

Q: Do you work on multiple pieces concurrently or focus on exclusively one at a time? If the former, how do you balance that? If the later, how do you decide which one to start next?
CI: I work on a few pieces at the same time. As we all know when you hit the “miserable middles” you usually want to walk away. When I have a few things in progress I can go to another piece and view it with a fresh eye and usually resolve a problem that was causing me to walk away from that one!

Q: How do you come up with ideas to begin something new?
CI: Having been a Creative Director for so many years, I am constantly looking for inspiration around me. My “sketchbook” has always been a camera and I compose through it’s lens. I usually carry a small point and shoot and the iPhone, so when something interesting strikes me I can immediately record it and store it for future use.

Q: What keeps you motivated to continue making art?
CI: The world around me. Everywhere I go, everything I see, the people I meet, and the journey that lies ahead are always my motivations.

Q: What’s the biggest “risk” you’ve taken in your journey as an artist? Creatively, in a business sense, or in life?
CI: Since I was a business woman with a pretty successful ad agency, I was used to the risks that I took for the 40+ years that I worked in that unstable industry (advertising). I mortgaged my house to do that and successfully paid it off, so starting from scratch in another unstable industry (the fine art world) was just another challenge. Since I knew that I had to somehow making a living at this second career in my life, I put together a business plan just as I had for the ad agency. It is a sad statistic that 95% of all start ups fail in the first five years. I knew that. So I was determined to set reasonable goals for yourself you can get there. It’s tough (I went from making a six figure salary to making $15k the first year after I lost the agency) but somehow I managed to build a base of students and with the help of two incredibly generous friends, Claudia Seymour and Richard McKinley, I was guided through the world of today’s fine art world. So this is my second career and business. Looking back I would have it no other way.

Learn more about Christine’s Nightscapes in Pastel Workshop with us here.
Find out more about Christine on her website and give her a follow over on Facebook.

Workshop Report: Studio Painter’s Guide to Success with Plein Air & Still Life with Leah Lopez

It was a week of all varieties of weather for Leah Lopez’s indoor/outdoor workshop guiding studio painters through both plein air and still life painting. The week concluded with two beautiful days of painting on Fredrick Church’s historic Olana.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

And of course, our video for the week, found on our YouTube channel!

Five Questions for Artist Peter Fiore

Joining us from May 6-12, 2018 will be artist Peter Fiore for a workshop on landscape painting from photographs. Before his workshop, Peter took a moment to give us a taste of his approach to art through our five question interview series.

Q: When did art first enter your life?
PF: Art entered my life when I first opened my eyes — seeing and remembering — my first memories are about light.

Q: Do you have certain themes in your work or subjects that reappear?
PF: I use the landscape to convey the feeling and quality of light. Light is the true subject of my paintings.

Q: If you could give only one piece of advice to a beginning artist, what would it be?
PF: Don’t expect to make the finished painting in an hour. Making art is a life time battle.

Q: What drives you to produce new art?
PF: The need to communicate. The need to make things.

Q: What show, project, or event are you most looking forward to in 2018?
PF: I’m embarking on a new body of work.

Learn more about Peter’s Landscape Painting: Beyond the Photograph workshop here.
Find out more about Peter on his website and give him a follow on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube.

Five Questions for Artist Christine Camilleri

This spring, we look forward to welcoming British Columbia based artist Christine Camilleri for a five-day studio workshop from April 29-May 5, 2017. Christine’s workshop will focus both on color and composition. In advance of her workshop, Christine took a moment to help us get to know her a little better!

Q: What’s been your most unexpected source of inspiration?
CC: I am inspired by many unexpected things: an unusual perspective, a story line, an abstract design that makes me think of something to work up, a shock of color where I didn’t expect it. I always want to challenge myself and my viewers.

Q: How has teaching impacted your personal art practice? And vice versa, how does your approach to your personal art impact your teaching style?
CC: I took a workshop once where the instructor said, “Every time you pick up a pastel or a brush loaded with a particular color you should be able to tell anyone what you’re using that for”. That was a breakthrough moment for me: before hearing this I was experimenting (producing “mud”) and adding marks without intent. I then challenged myself to have a ready response and to understand that if I didn’t have one, then I, and the painting, were losing direction. I take that thinking into my painting classes to share with my students. 

Q: What’s one tip you have or trick you use for keeping your studio space organized?
CC: In order to stay creative and focused I clean out my studio once or twice a year. I don’t mean wash the floors and dust. I mean I throw out old ideas, sketches and half finished paintings. I find I have to be ruthless. It clears my mind and helps me to see where I am going. I don’t want to fill my visual space with things that are half done or forgotten pulling me back to “finish” them one day, some day. I also keep my mediums separate and work on one medium for weeks at a time. Oils in one corner, pastels on a big table, acrylics on another table. Some paintings lend themselves to a certain medium and that way they are accessible at a moment’s inspiration.

Q: Who are your art heros? Who do you admire and why?
CC: I enjoy artists who exert competence, color mastery and story telling ability: these include but are not limited to Howard Terpning, Charlie Russell, Richard Schmid, Sheila Reiman, Liz Haywood-Sullivan, Jeanie Dobie, and Skip Lawrence.

Q: What exciting projects are you working on right now or big dream projects you would love to begin exploring?
CC: Bison have become a fascinating focus and I am drawn to wide, open landscapes like the prairies they once roamed. I am planning a series of paintings inspired by the last of the intact prairie areas in Canada and the US and hope to capture what these may have looked like before settlement. 

Learn more about Christine’s Let’s Boss Around Color & Composition Can Be Fun workshop here
Find out more about Christine on her website!

Five Questions for Quilt Artist Paula Nadelstern

We look forward to welcoming quilt artist Paula Nadelstern back to our workshop series next year from April 8-14, 2018! Paula’s workshop will cover unique machine-piecing techniques that are basic and intuitive, as well as both color and fabric guidelines for creating the complex and mobile reflection of a kaleidoscope – specifically for intermediate to advanced students. Get to know a bit more about Paula and her approach to art in our interview with her below!

Q: What’s been your most unexpected source of inspiration?
PN: My own fabric designs inspire me. I’m often asked if I design a specific fabric for a specific new quilt idea. If I understand the question correctly, the answer is no. First come the patterns and then come the quilts. I can’t wait to see where the fabric will lead me; I need to physically handle it to uncover its secrets. I’m as curious as if I hadn’t been part of the process.
I don’t have an art or textile design background. My degrees are in Occupational Therapy with a Masters in Psych, although I haven’t worked in the field in a very long time. Until my unplanned, unexpected apprenticeship with textile designers, everything I knew about color I learned as a kid from my prized box of sixty-four, kid-worthy crayons.

Q: How has teaching impacted your personal art practice? And vice versa, how does your approach to your personal art impact your teaching style?
PN: It’s not until you teach something to someone that you understand it really well. Breaking down your own creative act, first by identifying your personal strategies, and then by dividing them into a sequence of steps, forces you to reflect on what things aren’t as well as what they are. This exploration steers you in lots of valuable directions. It leads you to the vocabulary needed to articulate your private visual language. It helps you recognize the kinds of mistakes students are likely to make and head them off at the pass. And it awakens new ideas, pushing you, the artist, further along your creative path. 
A major distinction between the work of a teacher and that of an artist is the proximity to the creative act. The artist initiates and implements the work, investing her entire self into the art. Teaching is also creative but in a very different way. The teacher initiates by sharing an approach but someone else implements. It requires the ability to derive satisfaction from other people’s accomplishments. To be content with being the source of inspiration rather than the one inspired.

Q: What’s one tip you have or trick you use for keeping your studio space organized?

PN: I have no tips for keeping my 12 feet by 15 feet studio organized. Buy a magic wand on Ebay? If you get any good ones, send them my way — if they don’t need a lot of space or take up an inordinate amount of time. 
However, here’s how I store my quilts in a two-bedroom, 9th floor New York City apartment. In the living room, I’ve had two 12” wide by 28” high cabinets built. Placed against two walls, the one behind the couch is 92” long and the one under the TV is 72”. There is a door at each end. I roll up the quilts and slip them into the cabinets. 

Q: Who are your art heros? Who do you admire and why?

PN: Itchiku Kubota (1917-2003) was a Japanese textile artist. He was most famous for reviving and modernizing a lost late-15th- to early-16th-century textile-dyeing and decorating technique called tsujigahana (literally, flowers at the crossroads). Kubota’s grand scheme was a series of kimonos called Symphony of Light, intended to depict the “grandeur of the universe”. At the time of his death, he had completed 40 of his projected 80 kimono in the series. Kubota’s unique vision for this series involved a decorative landscape design that flowed from kimono to kimono, resulting in a panorama of seasons and views. 
I am in awe of his highly refined process creating a fluid, rather than static, surface. Each kimono offers a fresh revelation of the complexities inherent in Kobota’s labor-intensive approach. As he said in his video: he makes you see brown where there is no brown. 

Q: What exciting projects are you working on right now or big dream projects you would love to begin exploring?
PN: For the past two summers, I’ve been working on a giant quilt referencing the Old Prague Synagogue Ceiling. As soon as I looked up at this ceiling in 2014, I knew I’d found a quilt idea. I am a Patternista, hardwired to see pattern everywhere and here was a glut of designs bumping into each other. I think I could work on this one quilt for the rest of my career, editing, auditioning and refining as the nuances and possibilities of the concept evolves. It will be the forty-first quilt in my KALEIDOSCOPIC series.

Learn more about Paula’s Kaleidoscope Quilts workshop here.
Find out more about Paula on her website.

Five Questions for Artist Paula Kovarick

Interested in a new approach to free motion quilting? Join us for a three-day workshop with artist and trained graphic designer, Paula Kovarik from April 4-8, 2018.

Want to know a little more about Paula and her approach to art? Read on down for her responses to our five question interview series!

Q: What was your path to becoming a full-time working artist?
PK: I had my own graphic design business for over 30 years. From the beginning my goal was to retire from that business early so that I could pursue my own art. That happened about 5 years ago. I am still a designer but now I can design for myself instead of others. 

Q: Do you work on multiple pieces concurrently or focus on exclusively one at a time? If the former, how do you balance that? If the later, how do you decide which one to start next?
PK: I usually have more than one piece going at the same time. I find that larger pieces need some rest between sessions so that I can see the life in them come into focus. If I work on a piece without stopping to think about it I can sometimes get lost in the details instead of the whole. In addition, I do a lot of exploratory stitching on small pieces to test threads, fabrics, batting and dyes. 

Q: How do you come up with ideas to begin something new?
PK: Reading, learning, reading, learning, reading, learning. When an idea comes to me it is often just a glimmer of a thought, a thumbnail sketch or a flicker on the edge of consciousness. I try to have a child’s focus, open to awe.

Q: What keeps you motivated to continue making art?
PK: It’s in my DNA. I don’t have a choice. Though sometimes there are blank zones (often on completion of a piece), a walk in the woods or a new book or article will reinvigorate me.

Q: What’s the biggest “risk” you’ve taken in your journey as an artist? Creatively, in a business sense, or in life?
PK: My parents taught me that you create your own reality. I am still learning about risks but I know that I have what I call the “power of arbitrary decision.” If presented with a problem I seek the most efficient and direct solution — then do it. My training as a graphic designer — working on deadline, with the constraint of budget and format — helped me to focus in on what is the most important part of any communication. I look at my artwork as a process rather than a product. It’s the process I seek. Not the end product. So if I feel like taking a rotary cutter to a piece because it might lead me to new insights, I do it.

Learn more about Paula’s Follow The Thread Workshop with us here.
Find out more about Paula on her website and give her a follow over on Pinterest & Instagram.

Five Questions for Fiber Artist Lyric Kinard

We’re kicking off our 2018 fiber art workshop series with a fun three days of playing with paint led by Lyric Kinard. In this design intensive, Lyric will offer a perfect mix of surface design techniques and instruction in the elements and principles of good design.

In preparation for her workshop, we asked Lyric to fill us in a bit more on her approach to art;

Q: When did art first enter your life?
LK: It’s been with me in one form or another all my life. Music, writing, architecture.. all were important to me before textile art found me about 20 years ago.

Q: Do you have certain themes in your work or subjects that reappear?
LK: I have a broad range of interests in subject matter, but my abstract work almost always involves circles and grids and my portraiture is usually inspired by the women in my family.

Q: If you could give only one piece of advice to a beginning artist, what would it be?
LK: Make lots of art. Lots and lots and lots of it whether you think it’s good or bad. Don’t give up or get frustrated if your work doesn’t live up to your vision – learn what you need to learn from the bad art. Your bad art is often the very thing you needed to create in order to get to your good art.

Q: What drives you to produce new art?
LK: The most honest answer would be a quickly approaching deadline. 🙂 The other answer is that my head is full of questions and “what if’s” and ideas. It’s full to bursting all the time so when I make time for my studio there is always something to play with.

Q: What show, project, or event are you most looking forward to in 2018?
LK: I want to continue an abstract series I started last year inspired by mill wheels. I still have many ideas to explore inspired by the ideas of time and stone and grinding… and of course the circles and lines.

Find out more about Lyric on her website and give her a follow on Instagram, Twitter, Pinterest, & YouTube.

Five Questions for Artist Margaret Evans

As our first workshop of the 2018 season, we look forward to welcoming back Scottish artist Margaret Evans! Margaret will be joining us from March 18-24, 2018 and expanding her Unleashing the Pastels curriculum for artists of all mediums! Margaret herself will working in pastels, but will also bring watercolor, gouache, and water soluble pens for additional demonstrations.

In advance of her workshop, Margaret took a moment to answer a few questions we had about her approach to art.

Q: What’s been your most unexpected source of inspiration?
ME: Scottish weather!

Q: How has teaching impacted your personal art practice? And vice versa, how does your approach to your personal art impact your teaching style?
ME: I have to remind myself of what I preach when getting into difficulties! I make it fun, and remind all to keep an open mind and willingness to gamble.

Q: What’s one tip you have or trick you use for keeping your studio space organized?
ME: A quick morning tidy up before starting work – otherwise i can’t find anything and trip over things.

Q: Who are your art heros?
ME: Robert Wade (AUS) and John Singer Sargeant.

Q: What exciting projects are you working on right now or big dream projects you would love to begin exploring?
ME: Working on large scale corporate paintings and exhibiting outside Scotland.

— 
 Find out more about Margaret on her website and give her a follow on Facebook & Instagram to see what she’s up to!

Workshop Report: Large Scale Figures In Cloth with Susan Else

Fiber artist Susan Else visited our studio for a very different kind of workshop crafting figures out of cloth!  Here’s a few things her students had to say about their experience;

Wonderful. The instructor was excellent. Class description was perfect. I learned so much about workshop no with fabric in a 3-d way. I also learned new techniques and about new tools.

Susan was excellent. The convenience of living, working, and eating on site was fabulous.”

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

And of course, our video for the week, found on our YouTube channel!

Workshop Report: Subject to Interpretation with Joe Cunningham

We were so pleased to welcome Joe “The Quilter” Cunningham to our studio for the first time this year. His workshop came with insightful activities that gently pushed and encouraged all the students to think creatively and with fresh ideas about quilting and quilt blocks. Here’s a few things his students had to say about their experience;

Very enjoyable week with Joe and his guitar! I commuted this time, next time I’ll stay, lovely place!

I have done a workshop with Joe before. I really like his teaching style and the general feel of his workshops.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class. 

And of course, our video for the week, found on our YouTube channel!

Workshop Report: Capturing the Moment with Kim English

It was a beautiful week in early August to have artist Kim English and a troop of outdoor painters working to perfect their quick sketching techniques with oil paints. As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

  
And of course, our video for the week, found on our YouTube channel!
 

Workshop Report: Impressionist Approach to Watercolor with Alvaro Castagnet

We had a full house of 20 artists for a weekend watercolor workshop with Uruguayan artist Alvaro Castagnet at the beginning of August. Aside from onsite painting around the Hudson River Valley, the workshop was also treated to a full birthday surprise for one of our attendees with balloons and a very special gluten free cake from a local bakery. Here’s a few things the students had to say about their experience;

As a day student, I liked seeing the Greenville Arms Inn very much, and was impressed with the quality of the paintings on the walls of the inn. Any of the staff that I happened to meet were very friendly and helpful.

Thank you so much for offering vegetarian options at lunch and dinner . . . plus making them gourmet! Gnocchi was magnifico; apple pie and chocolate chip cookies outstanding.”

Alvaro’s workshop exceeded my expectations! I was familiar with his paintings, and I had seen some of his videos, but to witness his painting, and his explanations he gave as he painted was dramatic and exciting and eye-opening. I greatly appreciated his opening lecture on his philosophy of art, which clarified for me my mission as an artist.

My stay at the Greenville Arms for the Alvaro Castagnet Watercolor Workshop has been a complete delight. I have a severe Gluten allergy complicated by other food allergy considerations, yet, for every meal Chef Mark LaPolla produced completely delightful gourmet meals that more than met my needs and made me feel so pampered and so welcome.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

Workshop Report(s): Collage & Watercolor Studio with David Daniels

An unexpected turn of events brought watercolor artist David Daniels to our studio for two weeks at the end of July. Through two workshops, the studio turned into a vibrant space full of color through the creation of collage and watercolor pieces alike. Here’s a few things his students had to say about their experience;

Wonderful week of painting in an atmosphere of tranquility and inspiration.”

I didn’t know what I was getting into, I thought it would be the usual watercolour but David Daniels was a real surprise. He pitched the course at an advanced level gave us so much theory and instruction we’ll be busy all winter. And he did it all with great humour and fun.

The instruction, as always with Dave, was excellent, and tailored to individual needs. The lighting in the studio was great. Also, this is less tangible–but the group dynamics were terrific, and I appreciated the chance to focus on conversations with friends I hadn’t seen in a long while, especially during dinner.

Dave Daniels creates such a relaxed atmosphere in which to learn and try new things and fosters collaboration between the participants so everyone, no matter where they are starting from, can move forward.”

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page; Collage & Watercolor here and Watercolor Studio here. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

 And of course, our videos for the week, found on our new YouTube channel!

Workshop Report: Watercolor Landscapes & Still Life with Paul George

The first of four watermedia workshops during the month of July brought long time instructor Paul George to us for a long weekend workshop. Here’s a few things the students had to say about their experience;

The workshop was tremendously worthwhile; I felt Paul George’s approach was perfect – low-key, inspirational, and directed. The staff did a superb job of making us all feel welcome, and of course, the food was excellent! I only wish it could have gone on for another few days. Many thanks!

I loved the workshop with Paul George — he was engaging, hugely talented, kind, and clear. I left feeling as if I had really learned some very important perspectives and practical steps. I felt very inspired.

First, thank you for a lovely experience. In many ways it exceeded my expectations, particularly with respect to the bonding of the participants and instructor. I don’t know if that was particular to our group or just the way things go when you have like-minded people who are all gathered for a similar pursuit. The staff was kind and welcoming.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

And of course, our video for the week, found on our new YouTube channel!

Workshop Report: Expressive Portraits with Paul Leveille

Portrait artist Paul Leveille joined us last month for a week of painting in pastel, oil, and watercolor. Paul provided three demos, one for each medium, before spending the rest of the week providing individual instruction to the students. Here’s a few things we heard from the students after the workshop;

“Paul was wonderful! I learned so much….great instructor. The inn made everything just perfect! Excellent experience!”

“Paul is s very professional, talented teacher as well as artist. I was very impressed!”

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

Have you heard, we’ve also launched a YouTube page to share our videos with those of you who aren’t so into Facebook! We hope you enjoy this look into experiencing one of our workshops!

Workshop Report: Fractured Landscapes with Katie Pasquini Masopust

We welcomed back fiber artist Katie Pasquini Masopust last month and watched her amazing students tackle some stunning fractured landscape pieces! Here’s a few things we heard from the students about their experience;

Way beyond expectations!! Excellent!.

I learned about ways to use value to bring dimensionality to my work, learned the importance of variety in my fabric stash, and learned the fun technique of fracturing to add an element of design to my work.

Instructor, meals, staff were all excellent!”

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

And of course, our video for the week, found on our new YouTube channel!

Workshop Report: Loosen Up With Aquamedia Painting with Robert Burridge

Artist and ever popular instructor Robert Burridge joined us for a week early last month to share his inspiring approach to making art as well as his famed magic show along with Chef de Cuisine Mark LaPolla! Here’s a few things we heard from the students when asked if their expectations were met;

Yes and more…staff was friendly and welcoming…food was amazing. Loved that they accommodated my dietary needs.

Yes! Came home energized with lots of new ideas and resources.

above and beyond what I expected….. Bob brought a great energy, humor, patience and he willingness to share scads of information he’s gained over the years, and his demos were enlightening.”

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

New for this workshop, we’ve also launched a YouTube page to share our videos with those of you who aren’t so into Facebook! We hope you enjoy this look into experiencing one of our workshops!

Workshop Report: Loosen Up & Get Painterly with Patti Mollica

Seventeen students filled our studio for a week of learning from one of our most popular instructors, Patti Mollica. Patti guided them through a variety of timed and structured exercises – including one which limited their brush strokes – to study both color and value in acrylic and oil paints.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.


Workshop Report: Watercolor from Within with Barbara Nechis


While watercolorist Barbara Nechis now visits us all the way from wine country in California. She used to be based out of upstate New York and has been teaching with the Hudson River Valley Art Workshops since close to the founding of the school in the mid-1980s.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.

Workshop Report: Visual Improvisation with Jane Davies


Artist Jane Davies spent her first week with us and a full house of eighteen students using acrylic painting, collage techniques, and more to create beautiful and colorful abstract art.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.

Five Questions for Fiber Artist Esterita Austin

Fiber artist Esterita Austin returns to Greenville at the tail end of our season for a workshop exploring her original technique utilizing fusible web to transfer original painted imagery to Organza using metallic acrylic and textile paints. In preparation for her December 3-9, 2017 workshop, Esterita took a moment to answer a few questions about her approach to fiber art.

Q: What do you want your work to do?
EA: Inspire quilt artists to try a new expressive technique that can add new techniques to their quilt tool box.

Q: How has your style changed over the years?
EA: I started quilting making traditional quilts. After having taken a few art quilt workshops I began being more spontaneous and designed my own. I was still using cotton fabrics. Eventually I began using a variety of fabrics other than cotton, as well as using paint to further enhance my pieces. Eventually my pieces sequel into pure paint which I then transferred onto transparent organza. I have now found my niche combining painting and quilting. Sometimes it takes a while to find your voice and sing on key!

Q: How do you come up with a profitable pricing structure for your pieces?
EA: It’s just a gut feeling. I don’t want to price my work out of the market. If I want it to sell I will put a reasonable, or what I think is reasonable, price on it. 

Q: Do you have a motto?
EA: Technique is only a tool for expression.

Q: Are involved in any upcoming shows or events? Where and when?
EA: I have three shows going on now until mid June in Ohio in conjunction with QSDS and Dairy Barn. One is “Pushing the Surface 2017” at the Johnson-Humrickhouse Museum in Coshocton, Ohio. the other is “With These Hands” at the Ross Art Museum in Delaware, Ohio.

Learn more about Esterita’s workshop with us here.
Learn more about Esterita on her website

Workshop Report: Abstracting from Nature

Quilt Artist Jane Sasaman returned a fiber art workshop inspired by the natural world and filled with big, bold, and beautiful floral designs! Here’s a few things we heard from the students about their week;

Yes, the workshop exceeded my expectations, and they were high! Jane is a wonderful, supportive instructor!

Jane is an extraordinary teacher – sensitive, experienced, and supportive!

Overall this was amazing from pre-registration through departure. Thank you for providing such a fun, affordable, challenging retreat. 

Jane will be hard to top! Jane is remarkably generous with her time, talent, and knowledge, She brought many of her wonderful quilts to show. She has a great ability to teach her techniques and inspire individuality. Great at giving, tips, help, and suggestions. 

The whole Inn staff is warm, helpful, and welcoming, You have created such a special place!

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.

Five Question for Quilt Artist Sue Rassmussen

Instructing since 1988, quilt artist Sue Rassmussen will be joining us for a three-day workshop at the end of the year on Machine Quilting In Depth. From November 29-December 3, spend an immersive long weekend learning to create designs while quilting – and yes, we do have machines available to rent while you’re here!

In advance of her workshop, Sue took a moment to fill us in on her approach to fiber art and a bit on her current projects.

Q: Where do you draw your inspiration from?
SR: I find inspiration for my quilting designs in textures all around me, from literally watching and drawing the movement of ants as they do their search for food to fissures in boulders to bark on trees. If we all take a minute to look around us, we will recognize that the world is filled with texture and designs. It’s only a snap shot away. A perfect example of this is several years ago we were visiting Yellowstone National Park. I asked my husband to pull over so I could take photos of the beautiful birch bark in the grove of trees. I must have been taking pictures for 10-15 minutes, and when I turned around there were five other campers parked, all crowding around my husband who was trying to explain that, no, there were no animals there but that I was taking pictures of the bark. None of them came to even look at the wonderful designs in the bark. Their loss!

Q: What are you most proud of in regards to your art?
SR: I love working with photos of animals (and flora) and transforming them into realistic (or not) quilts. I enjoy the machine quilting process because it adds a secondary layer to quilts which equals more interest and texture.

Q: What are your biggest challenges to creating art and how do you deal with them?
SR: I think finding more time, not getting sidetracked by the computer or the television, and believing that this is an important and justified use of my time.

Q: What advice has influenced you?
SR: One of my first teachers and now friend, Margaret Miller, once said to me “Why use one fabric when you can use five?” and then two seconds later said to me “why use only five fabrics when you could use twenty?” and from that moment on I have been shopping for variety of fabrics. Using a wide variety of fabrics in my mind just make the quilt more interesting and challenges me to think outside the box.

Q: Is there something you are currently working on, or excited about starting that you can tell us about?
SR: I have been collecting silk fabrics for some time and because I don’t generally use solid type fabrics, this is a bit more challenging for me, but fun! I am beginning a ‘landscape’ with these wonderful fabrics. Lately I have been moving into more art quilts and I love to just play with all my scraps to create a collage background to to do something with.

Learn more about Sue’s workshop here.

Learn more about Sue on her website.

Workshop Report: Quilt the Environment with Repurposed Materials

Art quilter Deborah Fell joined us for the first time a couple of weeks ago for a small but mighty workshop filled with the most creative uses of found and reused materials! One student even managed to reuse the wrappers from our soap bars and tea tags in her pieces.

As always, we’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.


Workshop Report: Painting with Thread

Our first fiber art workshop of the year kicked off on April 2nd with an instructor coming to us all the way from Australia, Pam Holland! This was a detail oriented workshop as nine students worked to paint pictures of their own pets, beautiful birds, and more under Pam’s guidance.

We’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class and watch the video in our Facebook Video Library.

Workshop Report: Landscapes with Pastels

Our second workshop of the year kicked off on March 26th with six intrepid students, a slew of gorgeous photos for inspiration, and guidance from Susan Ogilvie. Each student brought a number of beautiful photos from their own travels to reinterpret through pastels. The early spring weather even gave the group just one day warm enough to do some quick sketches outdoors on our grounds in a warm sun.

We’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

Also, we’re also now producing videos of each of our workshops. For the moment, you can watch them through our Facebook Video Library.

Five Questions for Artist Alvaro Castagnet

Returning to the Hudson River Valley Art Workshops this year, all the way from Uruguay is watercolor artist Alvaro Castagnet. This year, Alvaro will be instructing a three-day workshop on an Impressionist Approach to Watercolor for intermediate and advanced students from August 3-9, 2017. In advance of his workshop, which is almost full, he kindly took a moment to answer a few questions for us.

Q:Where do you draw your inspiration from?
AC: The hustle and bustle of life!

Q: What are you most proud of in regards to your art?
AC: Proud to be able to; get into the studio everyday, be honest with myself, and affect so many people in a positive way.

Q: What are your biggest challenges to creating art and how do you deal with them?
AC: The biggest challenge is to get my hand to reproduce what my heart feels.

Q: What advice has influenced you?
AC: Follow your heart, do not let anyone distract from your gut feeling.

Q: Is there something you are currently working on, or excited about starting that you can tell us about?
AC: I am always working towards improving my own work, to express with honesty my feelings and my personal view about art. This is why everyday is so exciting for me! A new opportunity!

Learn more about Alvaro’s workshop with us here.
Learn more about Alvaro on his website and follow him on Facebook or Twitter.

Five Questions For Fiber Artist Rosalie Dace

Coming to us all the way from South Africa in late autumn is fiber artist Rosalie Dace. From October 29th-November 4th, she’ll be instructing her workshop on African Cloths, Colors, and Quilts. In advance of her workshop, Rosalie was kind enough to share a bit more about her approach to art.

Q: Where do you draw your inspiration from?
RD: Inspiration is everywhere! I am in awe of the natural world and the richness it offers. How other artists respond fascinates me, whether they be painters, sculptors, weavers, writers, musicians, architects, or anyone else engaged in creating. Human experience and vision is always a source of inspiration. With this, comes the inspiration and expression of my own life.

Q: What are you most proud of in regards to art?
RD: That I have managed to create a body of work that reflects a personal history in textiles is amazing to me. Non of it existed before I made them. I am also proud, (and a bit scared!) of being involved in assessing other people’s visual work. I am proud of helping my students develop their creativity in the direction of their interest, and having them believe in themselves.

Q: What are your biggest challenges to creating art and how do you deal with them?
RD: My biggest challenge is often the start of the work when I have to move from the excitement of the possible, and actually do the work. From there, the challenge is the battle of wills of what I think, and what the work wants to do anyway as it becomes itself and takes on a life of its own! Keeping going when I feel lost is always a challenge.

Q: What advice has influenced you?
RD: Just do the work! I think Michael James says that in his book. Picasso also said, ” I get an idea and then it changes.”

Q: Is there something you are currently work on, or excited about starting that you can tell us about?
RD: I am continuing work on a couple of different things that may seem unrelated at first (one on windows, one of maps, and plans among others), but they’re actually all about identity and place.

Find out more about Rosalie’s workshop here.
Learn more about Rosalie on her website here.

Five Questions for Quilt Maker Joe Cunningham

Another new-to the Hudson River Valley Fiber Arts Workshops instructor this year is quilt maker Joe Cunningham! Joe began making quilts professionally in 1979, after a ten-year career as a musician in Michigan and will be teaching our students unique ways to use both piecing and appliqué from August 13-19, 2017 in his Subject to Interpretation workshop. To welcome him to our cadre of instructors, we asked Joe five short questions about his approach to art.

Q: Where do you draw inspiration from?
JC: As a student and lover of 19th Century quilts, I draw a lot of my inspiration from them. But I also stay in touch with current events, and use them as thematic material. Ultimately, though, I end up using everything I have ever seen, thought, or felt as source material for my work.

Q: What are you most proud of in regards to your art?
JC: I suppose the thing I am proud of is that I have figured out a way to make human-sized blankets that look at home on museum walls.

Q: What are your biggest challenges to creating art and how do you deal with them?
JC: The biggest challenge for me, aside from pesky technical challenges that are always there, is to find a path in my work where I am not over-thinking it, and where I am not under-thinking it. I am trying to let the content of the piece express itself through me with a minimum of mediation, with a maximum of fidelity to my concept Sometimes it is hard to judge when I am veering off that path. Another way to say it is that my challenge is to stay open and free and true to my original idea.

Q: What advice has influenced you?
JC: Seeing in my artist’s sketchbook this quote: “If it looks like art, it must look like someone else’s art.” My wife, Carol LeMaitre, has helped me stay on track over the years by reminding me that I am not here to please anyone else with my work. William Wiley has told me that I don’t need to worry about anything by making my own work, whatever it looks like.

Q: Is there something you are currently working on, or excited about starting that you can tell us about?
JC: I am currently in the beginning of a new series of quilts inspired by the Clovis people of 13,500 years ago. They invented spear points so elegant and effective at killing mammoths and mastodons that they drove them extinct. Also I have just begun working on a book about my work of the last 20 years.

Learn more about Joe’s workshop here.
Learn more about Joe on his website or follow him on Facebook and Instagram.

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Five Questions for Fiber Artist Susan Else

We couldn’t be more excited to be welcoming fiber artist Susan Else to our fiber art workshop series for the first time. From August 20-26, 2017, Susan will be with us instructing a workshop on constructing large scale figures in cloth. In advance of her workshop, Susan was kind enough to share her perspective behind making art.

Q: What do you want your work to do?
SE: I want my work to engage viewers. I see making art as a conversation, and a sculpture would not be finished for me if no one were to see it. Because cloth has so many domestic and comforting associations, I often use that “safe” surface (as well as humor) to draw viewers into my work, where we can think about more challenging issues.

Q: How has your work changed over the years?
SE: Wry commentary has been part of my work almost from the beginning, but as the years go by I find myself more and more drawn to “serious” topics; wars, recessions, mortality—you name it. At the same time, I’m in love with the pure beauty of color and pattern, so the work has become a balancing act between the two impulses.

Q: How do you come up with a profitable pricing structure for your work?
SE: A friend once told me to charge enough that I wouldn’t be sad when a piece sold, and I still think that is good advice. The truth is that very few fiber artists are able to make a living from their work alone, so teaching and day jobs (and spousal income) often fills the gaps. Making sculpture multiples is the usual ridiculous amount of time it takes to create textiles, so I have never had the expectation that my career would be particularly profitable. However, I grew up in a family of serious artists who made work with the intention of selling it, so I don’t have much difficulty parting with pieces once they’re finished to my satisfaction.

Q: Do you have a motto?
SE: Play. Take risks. Never believe that it’s impossible to figure out the mechanics of implementing the vision in your head. My entire career has been one long process of figuring out the technical aspects of something that no one else was trying to do. I’ve collaborated with a number of engineers and practical makers to get the work done.

Q: Are you involved in any upcoming shows or events? Where and when?
SE: This year I am working hard to complete a twelve-piece installation called “Without a Net,” which focuses on the old-fashioned circus and sideshow. Many of the twelve works are mechanized, lit up, and include sound, and together they will create a total experience for the viewer. The circus is a great venue for exploring the confluence between the splendid and the macabre, between fantasy spectacle and gritty reality, and between the celebration of human prowess and a fascination with (and exploitation of) human peculiarity. The installation will debut at the San Jose Museum of Quilts & Textiles in 2018.

Get more details about Susan’s workshop with us here
Learn more about Susan on her website.

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Art & Breakfast: Cottage Cheese Pancakes with Lingonberry

I discovered this recipe last year and it has been the favorite breakfast special ever since then. They are light, delicate, and fluffy pancakes and the lingonberry preserves send it over the top!

Cottage Cheese Pancakes with Lingonberry

Note: It’s best to make the batter at least 30 minutes in advance for the lightest pancakes. You can even make it the night before. IMG 0895 1 1/2 cups of cottage cheese (I use Cabot’s whole milk cottage cheese)
6 large eggs
3/4 cup unbleached, all-purpose flour
1/2 cup unsalted butter, melted
vegetable oil spray
Garnish: best quality lingonberry preserves & powdered sugar in a shaker

  1. Whisk the eggs in a mixing bowl. Whisk in the flour, until totally blended, and then whisk in the melted butter.
  2. With a rubber spatula, fold in the cottage cheese.
  3. Heat a nonstick griddle over moderately high heat and then coat lightly with vegetable oil spray.
  4. Using a 1/4-cup measure, ladle pancake batter onto the griddle, and cook for 1 – 2 minutes per side, until nicely browned on each side and cooked through.
  5. Serve the pancakes with a nice dollop of lingonberry preserves on top sprinkled with powdered sugar.

Serves 4 – 6, but be warned this is only breakfast special that it is not unusual for people to order a second helping!

Workshop Report: Expanding Your Vision with Oil & Cold Wax

On March 19th, we kicked off our 2017 season by welcoming abstract artist Lisa Pressman and nine students for a week of oil and cold wax painting. This fun loving group were some of the most prolific artists we’ve had in our studio – each day completing numerous, gorgeous, abstract pieces using the techniques taught by Lisa.

We’ll share a few of the images we captured here on our blog, but encourage you to also check out the full gallery on our Facebook page. You can also scroll back in our Instagram feed to see what we captured during the class.

Also, before we get started with a few more photos – make sure to keep checking back on our Facebook page for a class video that we’ll post within the next week!

Five Questions for Fiber Artist Lisa Binkley

Instructing one of our long weekend, three day workshops this year is fiber artist Lisa Binkley. Her August 26-30 workshop on Layered Surface Design will give special attention to the interaction of beads and thread with fabric patterns. Lisa kindly took a moment to take part in our annual instructor interview series to share some of her perspectives on her work.

Q: Where do you draw inspiration from?
LB: Nature, poetry, and the materials I use (fabrics, embroidery threads, and beads).

Q: What are you most proud of in regards to your art?
LB: I’m proud of the quality of my craftsmanship and the thought that goes into each piece of art I make.

Q: What are your biggest challenges to creating art and how do you deal with them?
LB: One of my biggest challenges is that I like to stick in very fine detail, so one quilt or embroidery may take six months or longer to create. I’m working on learning to stitch faster, but I still feel proud of the work I make.

Q: What advice has influenced you?
LB: My husband is a professional illustrator, and his feedback about composition has been very helpful. I also found Jane Sassaman’s* suggestions in her book, “The Quilted Garden” extremely helpful.

Q: Is there something you are currently working on, or excited about starting that you can tell us about?
LB: I’ve been dying a lot of my own fabrics the last few years, and I’m excited about a series I’m undertaking to start with white cloth and end up with pieced quilts that are entirely botanically dyed and printed by me and then intensely hand stitched with beads and embroidered threads. I’ll bring some with me in August!

Learn more about Lisa’s workshop with us here.
Learn more about Lisa on her website or follow her on Facebook and Instagram.

*A fellow Hudson River Valley Art Workshops instructor! Jane’s workshop begins at the end of next month from April 30-May 6 and is entitled Abstracting from Nature. Learn more about her workshop here and read Jane’s interview with us here.
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Five Questions for Pastelist Liz Kenyon

Pastelist Liz Kenyon will be found here at the Hudson River Valley Art Workshops from June 18-24 teaching her workshop, Loose and Vibrant Soft Pastel Painting. As we look forward to the fairer temperatures and greener landscape that awaits Upstate New York that month, Liz was kind enough to tell us a little bit more about her approach to art with our annual instructor interview series.

Q: What do you want your work to do?
LK: Everything! I want my work to result in award winning student art! I want my soft pastel paintings to be loose and vibrant with luminous colors, for the surface texture to be remarkable, for it’s creation to be ‘hands on,’ to layer the soft dry pigment with my fingers so directly that a viewer can hear my work breathing, for my work to be demanding and fund, and for my work with pastels to make my job as a teacher easy.

Q: How has your style changed over the years?
LK: The adage ‘all work and no play makes Jack a dull boy’ can apply to be because I’ve unfolded new fun methods of expressing and teaching color. I have developed a lighter touch; less pastel dust is falling onto my easel. My process of applying color has also advanced; instead of layering or glazing with a single stick, I paint with two or three pastels in order to create more transparency and pulsing passages. With curiosity as my guide, I’ve been exploring alternative subject matter like ‘silly selfies’ and eggshell set ups.

Q: How do you come up with a profitable pricing structure for your pieces?
LK: In this economy, I am happy to sell and support myself. In pricing my work I consider a list of things; 

  1. artist’s fee, myself
  2. professional framing under non-reflective glass
  3. studio maintenance, materials and supplies, commissions, shipping, and advertising
  4. size of the piece
  5. the buyer, is it a new customer, a repeat customer, one of my students, or a family member

Q: Do you have a motto?
LK: “Believe in myself and relax.” I use my motto whenever I see outstanding paintings in galleries or websites; I pause and ask myself if the artwork speaks to me and why. I use my motto when I’m deciding whether to enter a juried show or taking a workshop, to avoid questioning my own abilities and to avoid comparing my work to other artists, whenever I need to relax, to remind me there’s a buyer for my art, to remember that taking a workshop can be super fun and inspirational. My motto also changes to fit the circumstances.

Q: Are you involved in any upcoming shows or events? Where and when?
LK: I just completed teaching a four week class at the Scottsdale Artist School in Scottsdale, AZ. I am exhibiting at the Arizona-Sonora Desert Museum from February 18-April 18 – this is a juried show and I was awarded the second place prize. I am also exhibiting in a National Juried Show in Sedona, AZ from April 18-29, sponsored by the Arizona Pastel Artist Association. 


Learn more about Liz’s workshop with us here.
Learn more about Liz on her website.

A Few Questions for Watercolorist Paul George

Noted by International Magazine as a rare combination of a good painter and a creative teacher, Paul George will be found here in Greenville this July instructing a three-day workshop on Watercolor Landscapes & Still Life. We highly recommend this workshop for both beginners and experienced painters and there are still a few spots left! Before his workshop, Paul took the time to answer a few questions about his approach to art.

Q: What do you want your work to do?
PG: Inspire my feelings and emotions in the viewer.

Q: How has your style changed over the years?
PG: Yes, I think as with most artists, I have become looser and more confident and that shows as changes in your style and handling of subjects.

Q: How do you come up with a profitable pricing structure for your pieces?
PG: I base my pricing on experience. I have been painting and selling for over twenty years, so I have a good idea from experience in the market place what my pricing should be. I have a base price for size, for example; a 11″x14″ watercolor, I base at $500. But if a certain painting is exceptional in quality I may double or even triple that price. Or if I feel it is slightly below what I want in quality, I may sell it for less. Pricing also depends if I am selling the painting myself or through a gallery and their commission structure.

Q: Are you involved in any upcoming shows or events? Where and when?
PG: Lots of shows coming up during Summer; Art Associations, Mystic Seaport Gallery, Hudson Valley AA, and Lyme AA. 


Learn more about Paul’s workshop with us here.
Learn more about Paul on his website.